Lifestyle and fashion & more.....

To share, stories, information and resources found on the web.

May 31, 2013 1:57 am 1:42 am 1:37 am 1:37 am April 23, 2013 9:15 pm
April 16, 2013 2:26 pm
prettyporscha:

Hair.Body.Outfit ❤💋

prettyporscha:

Hair.Body.Outfit ❤💋

(via naturalhaireverything)

March 31, 2013 10:47 pm
If I had a dime for every interview that began with “So, tell me about yourself,” then I might not need a job. Companies know they’re not hiring a skill set; they’re hiring a human. The interview used to be the first chance to see a candidate’s true colors but now, looking at someone’s digital footprint allows recruiters to sift through applicants even earlier. The blending of personal and professional lives isn’t exactly new but the Internet does make it more easily accessible.
Job seekers are often reminded to be careful with privacy settings, to remove any photos that might put them in a negative light. But people looking for more digitally focused jobs are additionally encouraged to invest time into personal branding through blogs, Twitter or even Instagram.

Increasingly, it will not be enough to hide or mask a personal identity online, because the illusion of no digital footprint is itself seen as negative. So, in the sprit of “the best defense is a good offense,” one startup created a way for you to wrap up the best of your resume and social media activity into a personalized site that’s easy to provide to recruiters.
Vizify creates a paginated profile that visualizes data from social media accounts including Facebook, Foursquare, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter. Once you input all those sources, your profile will run about 11 pages — but you can edit everything and create new pages, each page focused on one content type: photo, factoid, quote, links and more. A page called “words” will aggregate the words you use a lot on Twitter along with visualizing the popularity of specific tweets. “Activities” uses Foursquare data to show places you frequently check in.

Co-founder and CEO Todd Silverstein says they interviewed more than 200 hiring managers, who say their biggest pain point is finding a cultural fit. Vizify’s graphical bios aim to showcase achievements alongside interests and quirks.

The site, which came out of beta this week, also launched Vizcards, which are customizable bumper stickers and each can take up a page in your profile. It’s a visual way to include things like a “bright idea” or your Myers-Briggs profile.
Vizify creates a paginated profile that visualizes data from social media accounts including Facebook, Foursquare, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter. Once you input all those sources, your profile will run about 11 pages — but you can edit everything and create new pages, each page focused on one content type: photo, factoid, quote, links and more. A page called “words” will aggregate the words you use a lot on Twitter along with visualizing the popularity of specific tweets. “Activities” uses Foursquare data to show places you frequently check in.

Co-founder and CEO Todd Silverstein says they interviewed more than 200 hiring managers, who say their biggest pain point is finding a cultural fit. Vizify’s graphical bios aim to showcase achievements alongside interests and quirks.

The site, which came out of beta this week, also launched Vizcards, which are customizable bumper stickers and each can take up a page in your profile. It’s a visual way to include things like a “bright idea” or your Myers-Briggs profile.

If I had a dime for every interview that began with “So, tell me about yourself,” then I might not need a job. Companies know they’re not hiring a skill set; they’re hiring a human. The interview used to be the first chance to see a candidate’s true colors but now, looking at someone’s digital footprint allows recruiters to sift through applicants even earlier. The blending of personal and professional lives isn’t exactly new but the Internet does make it more easily accessible.
Job seekers are often reminded to be careful with privacy settings, to remove any photos that might put them in a negative light. But people looking for more digitally focused jobs are additionally encouraged to invest time into personal branding through blogs, Twitter or even Instagram.

Increasingly, it will not be enough to hide or mask a personal identity online, because the illusion of no digital footprint is itself seen as negative. So, in the sprit of “the best defense is a good offense,” one startup created a way for you to wrap up the best of your resume and social media activity into a personalized site that’s easy to provide to recruiters.
Vizify creates a paginated profile that visualizes data from social media accounts including Facebook, Foursquare, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter. Once you input all those sources, your profile will run about 11 pages — but you can edit everything and create new pages, each page focused on one content type: photo, factoid, quote, links and more. A page called “words” will aggregate the words you use a lot on Twitter along with visualizing the popularity of specific tweets. “Activities” uses Foursquare data to show places you frequently check in.

Co-founder and CEO Todd Silverstein says they interviewed more than 200 hiring managers, who say their biggest pain point is finding a cultural fit. Vizify’s graphical bios aim to showcase achievements alongside interests and quirks.

The site, which came out of beta this week, also launched Vizcards, which are customizable bumper stickers and each can take up a page in your profile. It’s a visual way to include things like a “bright idea” or your Myers-Briggs profile.
Vizify creates a paginated profile that visualizes data from social media accounts including Facebook, Foursquare, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter. Once you input all those sources, your profile will run about 11 pages — but you can edit everything and create new pages, each page focused on one content type: photo, factoid, quote, links and more. A page called “words” will aggregate the words you use a lot on Twitter along with visualizing the popularity of specific tweets. “Activities” uses Foursquare data to show places you frequently check in.

Co-founder and CEO Todd Silverstein says they interviewed more than 200 hiring managers, who say their biggest pain point is finding a cultural fit. Vizify’s graphical bios aim to showcase achievements alongside interests and quirks.

The site, which came out of beta this week, also launched Vizcards, which are customizable bumper stickers and each can take up a page in your profile. It’s a visual way to include things like a “bright idea” or your Myers-Briggs profile.

March 30, 2013 11:19 am
One-Line Pitch: PayTango lets you pay by scanning your fingerprint instead of a card so you can leave the plastic behind.

Why It’s Taking Off: The startup aims to provide universities and gyms with a special scanner that connects the customer’s fingerprint with a credit card, debit card or loyalty card.

Forget paying with credit cards or even your phone, a new service is aiming to let you pay with just the touch of your finger.

PayTango, a startup founded by four students at Carnegie Mellon University, has developed a special scanner that prompts consumers to record their fingerprint and swipe a credit card, debit card or loyalty card to be associated with it in the system. The scanner is designed to be quick and easy to use (as the company demonstrated in a recent Vine video, below), and to integrate right into the retailer’s existing payment processing systems.

"What we can do is take biometric data and transmit it as hard data," Brian Groudan, co-founder of PayTango, told Mashable. "The computer looks at it the same way."
The PayTango team built an early prototype of the device at a hackathon last year while still in school and started piloting the technology at a restaurant at Carnegie Mellon. Since then, they have expanded to three other locations at their university and are currently in talks to bring PayTango to other universities as well as gyms and health clubs around San Francisco. It is also part of Y Combinator’s Winter 2013 class of startups, which demoed their products earlier this week.

Groudan says he and his co-founders were initially interested in trying to help consumers “consolidate all of your cards into one card,” but then they heard about a group of researchers at their university who used gesture-recognition technology to create doorknobs and other objects that recognize how they’re being touched. This changed the team’s thinking. “Our idea eventually evolved to ‘why do you even need a card?’”

PayTango certainly isn’t the first company to try using biometric data for payments. Several retailers and credit card companies have tested fingerprint payments in select markets over the years, including Discover and Mastercard. Groudan says PayTango hopes to differentiate itself by offering a more intuitive user experience and focusing on venues with “tight networks” like universities and health clubs. Eventually, the team hopes to roll the service out for transportation use and health care as well.

The startup has so far only raised money through Y Combinator, but is currently looking to raise a round.

Image courtesy of YouTube, PayTango

One-Line Pitch: PayTango lets you pay by scanning your fingerprint instead of a card so you can leave the plastic behind.

Why It’s Taking Off: The startup aims to provide universities and gyms with a special scanner that connects the customer’s fingerprint with a credit card, debit card or loyalty card.

Forget paying with credit cards or even your phone, a new service is aiming to let you pay with just the touch of your finger.

PayTango, a startup founded by four students at Carnegie Mellon University, has developed a special scanner that prompts consumers to record their fingerprint and swipe a credit card, debit card or loyalty card to be associated with it in the system. The scanner is designed to be quick and easy to use (as the company demonstrated in a recent Vine video, below), and to integrate right into the retailer’s existing payment processing systems.

"What we can do is take biometric data and transmit it as hard data," Brian Groudan, co-founder of PayTango, told Mashable. "The computer looks at it the same way."
The PayTango team built an early prototype of the device at a hackathon last year while still in school and started piloting the technology at a restaurant at Carnegie Mellon. Since then, they have expanded to three other locations at their university and are currently in talks to bring PayTango to other universities as well as gyms and health clubs around San Francisco. It is also part of Y Combinator’s Winter 2013 class of startups, which demoed their products earlier this week.

Groudan says he and his co-founders were initially interested in trying to help consumers “consolidate all of your cards into one card,” but then they heard about a group of researchers at their university who used gesture-recognition technology to create doorknobs and other objects that recognize how they’re being touched. This changed the team’s thinking. “Our idea eventually evolved to ‘why do you even need a card?’”

PayTango certainly isn’t the first company to try using biometric data for payments. Several retailers and credit card companies have tested fingerprint payments in select markets over the years, including Discover and Mastercard. Groudan says PayTango hopes to differentiate itself by offering a more intuitive user experience and focusing on venues with “tight networks” like universities and health clubs. Eventually, the team hopes to roll the service out for transportation use and health care as well.

The startup has so far only raised money through Y Combinator, but is currently looking to raise a round.

Image courtesy of YouTube, PayTango

10:55 am

Luvocracy!

Luvocracy is another kind of  Pinterest for people who actually want to buy stuff.

It is very simple to use and you can make money off of it too.

Collect the products you love and the one you think your friends will love too. 

Easily buy the recommended products by the people you trust , then earn rewards when people buy what you recommend!

The whole process is called LUVOCRACY.

March 29, 2013 11:57 am
Illinois governor Quinn speaking…. Inspiring!

Illinois governor Quinn speaking…. Inspiring!